Super Mario Bros. 35 Review – Mario Royale

Super Mario Bros. 35 marks something of a historic moment for the multitalented plumber. In Mario's extensive past, there have been plenty of multiplayer games, but many of these come in the form of sporting spin-offs or asynchronous multiplayer...

Super Mario Bros. 35 Review – Mario Royale

Super Mario Bros. 35 marks something of a historic moment for the multitalented plumber. In Mario's extensive past, there have been plenty of multiplayer games, but many of these come in the form of sporting spin-offs or asynchronous multiplayer where you take turns attempting levels. Even the likes of New Super Mario Bros. and Super Mario 3D World--both of which feature competitive elements--ultimately revolve around a shared goal of completing levels together as the main objective. This is where Super Mario Bros. 35 stands out; Mario's latest in a long line of entries is the first time you compete synchronously against other players on traditional platforming courses. It's a significant achievement both in and of itself and as an online multiplayer experience, even if there can be a few dull moments.

In the vein of fellow Nintendo Switch Online release Tetris 99, Super Mario Bros. 35 has you compete against up to 34 others simultaneously to be the last Mario standing, playing levels from the original NES Super Mario Bros. Like Tetris 99, your play area takes up the center of the screen while everyone else's concurrent games form a surrounding border, allowing you to glance at opponents' progress as you jump your way through course 1-1 and beyond. Essentially, the main two factors separating Super Mario Bros. 35 and Super Mario Bros. is the pressure of competition, plus a lot more enemies to navigate.

As is the case with most of Mario's platforming adventures, running out of time or dying are your only two methods of failure. However, there are no extra lives to be had here, only one chance per round to become the only Mario remaining. In your quest to be the number one mustachioed Italian man, you disrupt other players by defeating enemies, who will then be sent over to other courses. Additionally, taking another note from Tetris 99's playbook, you can select who to send those Goombas and Koopas to or let a preset choose--such as who has the least time remaining or anyone who's actively targeting you.

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